definition

A place to talk about your experience of living with Dyspraxia

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Ruth
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definition

Post by Ruth » Sat May 12, 2007 8:08 am

This week I had a childrens play equipment sales rep telling me that dysparaxia was a form of visual imparement! I mean really!!

I trotted out my pat definition of dyspraxia which is (xlears throat)

Dyspraxia is a neurological condition similar to dyslexia but where dyslexia is a difficulty with words and reading dyspraxia is a difficulty with sequancing and organisation both of physical and intellectual tasks.

Plaese can you guys give me some feedback. My intention is to develop a one liner that holds peoples attention and gives then some idea what it is that is difficult.

I came across an elegant adition in the DANDAnewsletter that goes...

It affects everyone that has it in different ways because it is a spectrum of subtle divergences from the norm rather than a single obvious difference.

I'm going to try and learn that bit too.

Does anyone else have a short definition they trot out when people don't know what dyspraxia is and if so could you share them with me please??

Thankyou x x

Lithium_joe
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Post by Lithium_joe » Sat May 12, 2007 9:07 am

I generally say it's a sequencing disorder that affects physical and mental-co-ordination.



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I gave that one to the lady who assessed me yesterday and she nodded enthusiastically because it is widely assumed, if understood at all, to be mostly rooted in physical unco-ordination. Which it is, but not exclusively so.

And it is also true that peoples problems are as diverse on the spectrum of need as they are running from mild to severe. So how people expereience the inability to sequence properly (either themselves, their bodies, their thoughts etc.,) will vary.

Dani
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Post by Dani » Sat May 12, 2007 12:39 pm

Lithium_joe wrote:I generally say it's a sequencing disorder that affects physical and mental-co-ordination.
Thanx. Sums it up nicely.. I'm going to use that next time someone asks me :)

Lithium_joe
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Post by Lithium_joe » Sat May 12, 2007 10:36 pm

Actually pointing out it's a "neurological condition" is also, I think, very useful. However, I forsee a disadvantage, which is that those are an awful lots of multi-syllable words to fit into what is supposed to be a clear and concise sentence! ;)

Ruth
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Post by Ruth » Mon May 14, 2007 8:15 pm

ok thanks for that. I've been scrting around using the word 'mental' probably uinnecessarily!

Lithium_joe
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Post by Lithium_joe » Mon May 14, 2007 8:56 pm

Glad to have helped. :-)

I think when I was younger I was much more physically affected by the dyspraxia, however as I have grown older, my brain mass has increased and so proportionally the area of damage/ injury / insult has grown less and so I find the symptoms of the disco-ordination to be more rooted in my general behaviour / thoughts etc - than my actual movements.

Although that said, I think I performed poorly in the dexterity tests and visual-motor skills of that assessment I mentioned above. So it is still there, lingering in the background as it were.

I pick up the report on Wednesday so I'll be in a clearer frame of mind then to know who the dyspraxia affects me today.

But I stand by by original answer that dyspraxia is a neurological condition resulting in a sequencing disorder that affects mental and physical co-ordination.

Lithium_joe
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Post by Lithium_joe » Tue May 15, 2007 12:51 am

There's a lot of concise information about dyspraxia and it's effects on this page. I recommend it to you.

http://www.dyspraxiausa.org/What_is_Dyspraxia.html

For a U.S website/organisation it is I think commendably pluralist and generalised.

Ruth
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Post by Ruth » Fri May 18, 2007 5:19 pm

I'll try that link next! did you pick up your report?

Lithium_joe
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Post by Lithium_joe » Fri May 18, 2007 5:49 pm

I did. :)

I am officially dyspraxic. \:D/

Why the smiles? Just I've had so many problems down the years and been told I've also had nothing wrong with me that it's nice to get it confirmed.

I did well in some tests (really well!) indicating all the hardwire up here is working very well indeed! #-o

But I did abysmally badly in others - and these areas all conformed to my reported problems. So I behaved according to type.

I've an A-level exam this Monday - I've already dangled this new report at them and been granted an extra 25% per hour for the exam.

Liz944
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Post by Liz944 » Fri May 18, 2007 10:52 pm

I just had my first exam where I have had the extra 25% time.... boy it makes a differences.... you wil find the time useful... \:D/
Drama is life with the dull bits cut out...

Lithium_joe
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Post by Lithium_joe » Fri May 18, 2007 11:32 pm

Hmmm well as I said - up there somewhere - dyspraxia is a sequencing disorder, and I, being a fool, decided a good strategy for improving my mathematical ability would be to sit an A-level in it. #-o

Good news is - it wasn't a bad idea. \:D/

The bad news is that maths is about as sequential a subject as they come. ](*,)

Well I say bad, actually I like the structure of a maths problem (though you'd struggle to get me to admit that out loud! [-()
Acquiring that structure on the other hand..ha ha ha... not easy! ;)

I get lost very easily thinking through the process of answering a question, it's like trying to grasp at fog, and worse I loose the confidence to recognise a good answer from bad or to look at what I've written and get back to where I made my error (The legendary poor proof reading skills.)

Having the extra 25 minutes, I hope, will give me the time to work through those moments and get back to working out the answer without having to waste time I need for other questions which only engenders more panic, worry and frustration.

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