Learning to Drive

Learning to drive, driving, and using public transport

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david456
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Learning to Drive

Post by david456 » Mon Feb 06, 2006 2:33 pm

I want to learn to drive, but I'm a bit worried about it. Is there any useful tips anyone can give me and driving?

David

Daniel
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Post by Daniel » Mon Feb 06, 2006 2:59 pm

I think one of the most important things if for your driving instructor to understand the areas you find difficult, so they go at the pace you're suited to. It varies from person to person of course, but many dyspraxics seem to need lots of lessons and a good few attempts at the test.

Good luck! Let us know how you get on!

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Pooky
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Post by Pooky » Mon Feb 06, 2006 3:35 pm

The main problem I suffered when learning to drive was my perception of distances and judging the speed at which cars are going.

I have to say this has improved with many more hours of driving experience though.

The main thing I would say though is have confidence and be willing to persevere as things do improve with practice. I think we would all be lying if we said we weren't worried about our first few driving lessons. I used to be petrified of taking the car out when I first passed (and I didn't pass first time, or even second time) incase I had an accident and hated every minute of it, but in time as my experience grew I started to enjoy it.

Also if you do find the co-ordination of driving a manual car difficult there is always the option of an automatic, hence reducing the number of things you need to think about.

Hope that helps.

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Post by towildhoney » Mon Feb 06, 2006 4:06 pm

I tried madly to learn to drive and failed I think its worth considering how severe your dyspraxia is. I I realise now will never have the ability to reverse around a corner. Driving lessons are expensive and I know from my own experience I wasted and awful lot of money by not realising my own limitations. I don't mean to be discouraging however give it a go but I would say its worth explaining your problems to your instructor and giving it say 6 - 10 lessons and then ask for an honest opinion as to whether you can drive.

carrie
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Post by carrie » Mon Feb 06, 2006 4:22 pm

hey am also debating whether to learn as i find doing multiple things at once hard and my distance perception is dodgy so am very panicky when in busy traffic
NOTHING MAKES LIFE MORE INTERESTING THAN THE WONDERS OF DYSPRAXIA

(*)CARRIE(*)

monkey
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Post by monkey » Mon Feb 06, 2006 7:30 pm

ive decided that im deffently going to learn. if it all truns to disaster ill stop.

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Post by Tortoise » Tue Feb 07, 2006 3:54 am

Don't be overwhelmed by the severity of your dyspraxia... now im not incouraging people to do something they simply can't do or is seriously unsafe. It will just be harder and take more time for you to learn and be safe.

It took me probably double the average time to learn to drive. And maybe even 5 more years to feel ok about driving. I had significant problems with judging distance, judging speed and timing etc etc (this still makes changing lanes v.v.hard). It took me years to be comfortable to drive on the left most lane because every time i passed a pole it felt that it was about to fall on top of me and caused an instant blinking reflex response! I went through a few instructors, one of which asked me to pull over to the side of the road one day and then said "CAN YOU ACTUALLY SEE?". Anyway, needless to say that i ditched that guy. It's so important to learn with someone very patient and understanding.

I won't bore you with more but although it was the hardest thing I've had to learn to do in my life, and at times i thought it would never be possible, I'm glad that i persisted. It's made me feel so much more independent and that is so important to me. However, I'm still very causious and only drive on roads that I'm familiar with. OH, and i also have beepers attatched to the car that beep to tell me how far away things are! It really helps.

BUT I have the navigation skills of gnat. I sort of have a small repertoire of places which I can get to myself. If I want to get to someplace new, I have to have someone physically show me how to get there first. Even though I know left from right, and can read a map, carrying this out in reality is a different story for me. I just can’t seem to do it. I just can’t seem to get somewhere I haven’t been before, (unless of course it is right next to somewhere I know very well!).

Has anyone on here used a GPS (navigation) system?? does it help or does it just confuse you more?????????????

Do you know of any other handy technological devices that makes driving easier??????????

carrie
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Post by carrie » Tue Feb 07, 2006 12:32 pm

yeah i know im determined and could do it eventually but i cant afford to take that long
NOTHING MAKES LIFE MORE INTERESTING THAN THE WONDERS OF DYSPRAXIA

(*)CARRIE(*)

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Post by Snjstar » Thu Feb 09, 2006 12:38 pm

Learn and you'll be thrilled when you finally succeed! I managed although I have got an automatic license and took longer and more tests then my friends!

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Post by Daniel » Thu Feb 09, 2006 7:53 pm

I think it's wonderful to see that so many have stuck with it and have managed to drive. That's good inspiration in itself.

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Post by fuzzy » Fri Feb 10, 2006 7:55 pm

Try learning in an automatic instead of a manual car- the gears for me were a nightmare!! I started learning but then quit; had much the same experience as Tortiose, our resident Ozzie!!
Goodbye, and have a pleasant tommorrow!!
I swear to drunk im not God.....

Tortoise
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Post by Tortoise » Sat Feb 11, 2006 5:02 am

:grin: \:D/ (either that or i get up really really early to post!)

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Post by Ruth » Sat Feb 11, 2006 2:00 pm

I finaal passed on my fifth attempt yes that's right FIFTH!! but pass Ii did and it's fab. I do now drive an automatic and I don't know why anyone drives anything else they are so much simpler.

I didn't know I had dyspraxia when I starrted to learn and so didn't realise why it was so hard and so different to my friends descriptions. My dad started to teach me and that was a disaster! I had 3 different instructors in the end I think.

Good luck with it

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Post by Daniel » Tue Feb 21, 2006 9:35 pm

Well done Ruth! It's great that you passed your test. Automatic cars do seem a popular option for dyspraxics. They used to quite rare in Britain but I think they're more common now. Do they cost much more than manual cars?

david456
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Post by david456 » Wed Feb 22, 2006 12:12 am

about 10% of cars in the UK are automatic, whereas nearly all are in the US. In terms of cost, it varies I guess, with the models. You can get some top of the range cars down to an average priced car.

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